Protest on the Page: Essays on Print and the Culture of Dissent since 1865 (The History of Print and Digital Culture) (Paperback)

Protest on the Page: Essays on Print and the Culture of Dissent since 1865 (The History of Print and Digital Culture) By James L. Baughman (Editor), Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen (Editor), James P. Danky (Editor), James Baughman (Editor), James Danky (Editor) Cover Image

Protest on the Page: Essays on Print and the Culture of Dissent since 1865 (The History of Print and Digital Culture) (Paperback)

By James L. Baughman (Editor), Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen (Editor), James P. Danky (Editor), James Baughman (Editor), James Danky (Editor)

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The use of print to challenge prevailing ideas and conventions has a long history in American public life. As dissenters in America sought social change, they used print to document, articulate, and disseminate their ideas to others. Protest always begins on the margins, but print is the medium that allows it to reach a larger audience. In Protest on the Page, scholars in multiple disciplines offer ten original essays that examine protest print culture in America since 1865. They explore the surprising range of dissidents who enlisted print in their causes—from vegetarians and anarchists at the advent of the twentieth century, to midcentury evangelicals and tween comic book readers, to GIs and feminists in the 1970s–80s. Together they demonstrate that print has never been a neutral medium, but rather has been instrumental in shaping the substance of protest and its audiences.
James L. Baughman is the Fetzer Bascom Professor of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His many publications include Republic of Mass Culture: Journalism, Filmmaking and Broadcasting in America since 1941 (Third Edition). Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen is the Merle Curti Associate Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the author of American Nietzsche: A History of an Icon and His Ideas. James P. Danky is the cofounder of the Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and retired librarian for periodicals and newspapers at the Wisconsin Historical Society. He is many books include Underground Classics: The Transformation of Comics into Comix.
Product Details ISBN: 9780299302849
ISBN-10: 0299302849
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Publication Date: April 20th, 2015
Pages: 278
Language: English
Series: The History of Print and Digital Culture
"These are fresh, fascinating inquiries into the unknown byways of American journalistic history. Protest on the Page amounts to an alternative history of the press, far different from the familiar triumphant and establishment-celebrating narrative."—Nicholas Lemann, Columbia University

"How great it is to have a book about the history of the press that's not about the New York Times or Washington Post, and not about the glories of a free press in a democracy. The journalism of visionary movements—anarchism, feminism, dissent in the military—is part of our heritage too, and it's great to see it get some of the attention it deserves."—Adam Hochschild, co-founder of Mother Jones magazine and the author of To End All Wars

"Historians of social change have always drawn upon ephemeral publications from the fringes of politics and culture. But the essays in this splendid collection show that the printed word has actually been a central player in the politics of social movements, from anarchism to vegetarianism. This sharp focus on media provides valuable new insight into how movement politics has worked in American history."—David Paul Nord, author of Faith in Reading

"A substantial contribution to the histories of print culture, media, journalism, and non-mainstream movements, groups, and ideas."—John Nerone, author of Violence Against the Press

“The latest addition to the outstanding University of Wisconsin Press series 'History of Print and Digital Culture,' deftly organized into three major sections (Revolt and Reaction, Consensus Contested, and Dangerous Print), Protest on the Page should be considered a critically important addition to academic library collections in communications and journalism.”—Midwest Book Review


“Its subject is invigorating: how ordinary people with passion for a cause seized the available print technology of the day to change other people’s minds, and ultimately the nation.”—Wisconsin State Journal

“Especially useful as a supplement to the traditional histories of American journalism that focus on the ‘mainstream’ media and the development and power of elite actors and the presses they control. There is much here that deepens and enriches our understanding of the history of dissent and resistance as well as the history of print media.”—JHistory, H-Net