Davy in the Snow (Hardcover)

Davy in the Snow By Brigitte Weninger, Eve Tharlet (Illustrator), David Henry Wilson (Translated by) Cover Image

Davy in the Snow (Hardcover)

By Brigitte Weninger, Eve Tharlet (Illustrator), David Henry Wilson (Translated by)

$19.95


On Our Shelves Now at:
Politics and Prose at 5015 Connecticut Avenue NW
1 on hand, as of Feb 22 5:25pm
A compelling story of sibling togetherness. Join Davy and his little sister on a snowy and exciting winter adventure to visit Grandma and Grandpa Rabbit!

A deep blanket of snow covers the wintery forest! Davy and Mia are unstoppable. They set out with their sled and a cake to visit their grandparents. Grandpa Rabbit tells Davy the story of when he and his brother were lost in the snow, while Grandma Rabbit plays a game with Davy’s sister. Davy and his sister head home with a warm send off of cookies and juice. But when they tumble out of their sled, the way home becomes confusing in the deep snow. Luckily, big brother Davy remembers Grandpa Rabbit’s wise advice—stay in one place, keep warm, help will come soon. And so, cozy and warm, under a large fir tree with glowing branches, Davy and Mia tell stories and sing songs. Until at last—the family tracks down the two snow bunnies. Davy worries that it’s his fault, but his parents praise him for his responsible decisions.

Davy in the Snow is the latest in the popular Davy series, written by Brigitte Weninger and illustrated by Eve Tharlet. Over 25 years ago, this unbeatable duo created the cheeky rabbit with a head full of mischief, but who is also helpful and compassionate. And it is precisely this compassion that carries through the latest loveable story. What better way to talk about the solidarity between siblings!

“What makes these books about this character so appealing is that there is a little bit of Davy in everyone.” –School Library Journal (Praise for Happy Birthday, Davy!)
Brigitte Weninger was born in Kufstein, Austria, and spent twenty years working as a kindergarten teacher before turning to writing full-time. She has since published more than sixty books, which have been translated into forty languages and received numerous awards. She continues to be heavily involved in promoting literacy, writing, and storytelling. She lives in Kufstein.

Eve Tharlet was born in France but spent much of her childhood in Germany. After graduating from the Superior School of Decorative Arts in Strasbourg, France, she began working as a freelance illustrator in 1981 and quickly received international acclaim. Her big breakthrough came with the series about Davy, the cute and cheeky bunny, which propelled her name around the world.

David Henry Wilson, born in London, is a playwright, novelist, children’s book author, and translator. His plays have been produced in many well-known theaters in Great Britain as well as abroad, and his children’s books—especially the Jeremy James series—have been translated into many languages. His novel The Coachman Rat received critical acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic. For many years he lectured at the universities of Bristol (England) and Konstanz (Germany), where he founded the university theater. His translations from French and German cover many subjects, ranging from literary theory, art, travel, and general culture to children’s novels and picture books.
Product Details ISBN: 9780735845022
ISBN-10: 0735845026
Publisher: NorthSouth Books
Publication Date: September 12th, 2023
Pages: 32
Language: English
Series: Davy
"A sweet tale of independence and family support."
— Kirkus Reviews

"A brave little rabbit applies advice from his grandfather to save the day in this touching tale of family devotion."
— Foreword Reviews

"beautiful illustrations capturing the charm and mystery of a snowy day."
— Children's Literature

"With its underlying them of solidarity between siblings, "Davy in the Snow" is a simply outstanding children's picture book for ages 4-8 and highly recommended for family, daycare center, preschool, and elementary school, and community library collections."
— Midwest Book Review