American Heiress: The Wild Saga of the Kidnapping, Crimes and Trial of Patty Hearst - Jeffrey Toobin

Staff Pick

The kidnapping of Patty Hearst by an obscure group of self-styled, violent revolutionaries calling themselves the Symbionese Liberation Army became one of the defining events of the 1970s. Unfolding live on nationwide TV, it riveted viewers for months as Hearst, a granddaughter of famed publisher William Randolph Hearst, appeared to side with her captors, posed as a machine-gun toting Tania—her nom the guerre—joined in robberies, and conspired to set off bombs. Arrested after nineteen months and charged with robbery, Hearst argued that her actions had been coerced. But she was convicted and sentenced to seven years, only to be released by Jimmy Carter after twenty-two months and ultimately pardoned by Bill Clinton. She married, wrote a memoir, and went on to lead a life of comfort and privilege. But in American Heiress: The Wild Saga of the Kidnapping, Crimes and Trial of Patty Hearst (Doubleday, $28.95), legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin brings new information and insight to what we thought we knew about this extraordinary story and to the central question of whether Hearst was a brainwashed victim or a willing participant in the SLA’s crimes.

American Heiress: The Wild Saga of the Kidnapping, Crimes and Trial of Patty Hearst By Jeffrey Toobin Cover Image
$28.95
ISBN: 9780385536714
Availability: Special Order—Subject to Availability
Published: Doubleday - August 2nd, 2016

American Heiress: The Wild Saga of the Kidnapping, Crimes and Trial of Patty Hearst By Jeffrey Toobin Cover Image
$16.95
ISBN: 9780345803153
Availability: Backordered
Published: Anchor - April 4th, 2017

Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy - Heather Ann Thompson

Staff Pick

Now is the time for this book. Heather Ann Thompson’s Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy (Pantheon, $35) is an in-depth look at a five-day revolt, and its aftermath, in one of the country’s most notorious prisons. To demand more humane treatment, 1,300 prisoners took charge of the entire facility, holding hostages to bolster their bargaining power. On the fifth day, the state stormed the prison with a show of brutal force, killing thirty-nine men—prisoners and hostages alike—and injuring hundreds more. Ultimately, only prisoners were tried, no state officials were held accountable, no support was given to the devastated victims and their families. This National Book Award Finalist is a report on mass incarceration, basic civil rights, and governmental abuse of power. Like I said, now is the time for this book.

Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy By Heather Ann Thompson Cover Image
$35.00
ISBN: 9780375423222
Availability: Special Order—Subject to Availability
Published: Pantheon - August 23rd, 2016

Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy By Heather Ann Thompson Cover Image
$18.95
ISBN: 9781400078240
Availability: Not On Our Shelves—Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Vintage - August 22nd, 2017

Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America's Most Storied Hospital - David M. Oshinsky

Staff Pick

No hospital in American history has been the source of more lore, whispers, and tabloid exposés than New York’s Bellevue. David Oshinsky’s well-researched historical account, Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America’s Most Storied Hospital (Doubleday, $30), makes for reading as compelling as any true-crime thriller. The author of Polio and Worse than Slavery, Oshinksy delves bravely into all the corridors of Bellevue’s past.  On the one hand Bellevue was one of the largest hospitals in American history and housed many of the best medical researchers, attending physicians, and professional nurses of the nineteenth century. On the other, it was viewed as a “bare-bones receptacle for the poorest of the poor, the dregs of society, the semi-criminal, starving, unwelcome class, who suffer and die unrecognized.” An absorbing topic, no doubt, and when you package it with Oshinsky’s easy writing style, you’ll spend hours engrossed in this book only to emerge wondering where the time has gone.